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05. Milda Zabarauskaitė, Robertas Narkus, “Curtain” / Laisvydė Šalčiūtė, “Imperfect Innocence”

Happy newlyweds rushing to a photo studio in the late 20th century probably never dreamed that, just a few decades later, their photographs would be considered a work of art. In 2007, the artists Milda Zabarauskaitė and Robertas Narkus decided to remind us of the days when visiting a photography studio was a special, festive event. To that end, they assembled a spatial installation out of wedding photographs gathering dust in personal photo albums. And the wedding motif became a perfect means for artists to rethink things which had long been taken for granted.

In one instance, artist Laisvydė Šalčiūtė and her spouse photographed themselves wearing wedding dresses. Šalčiūtė is intrigued by the traditional role of women and all of the duties that women are expected to perform but which, in reality, they have little opportunity to fulfill. In this context, we might recall George (Jurgis) Maciunas. In 1978, this renowned founder of the Fluxus movement held a performance during which he and his significant other, the poet Billi Hutching, dressed in wedding gowns.

Clearly, a rethinking of our images of the sexes has been taking place in contemporary art for decades. In a moment we’ll explore how artists address these issues in their most recent works.

Milda Zabarauskaitė, Robertas Narkus
Curtain, 2007–2021
Installation
Property of the artists

Laisvydė Šalčiūtė
Imperfect Innocence, 2010
Digital print, 200 × 116
MO Museum collection